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14 August, 2018

 

A midwife member of the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) has won compensation of almost £5000 at a tribunal over indirect sex discrimination by One-to-One Midwives (North West), her former employer.

Naomi Leigh-Poole took One-to-One to a tribunal because they failed to inform her of potential jobs she could apply for at the organisation, at time when she faced possible redundancy. This was despite her making a written request for them to keep her informed of potential jobs while she was on maternity leave.

2 August, 2018

A new Position Statement from the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) supports the universal provision of baby boxes in the UK. Currently baby boxes are given to all new babies in Scotland. In England some NHS Trusts have introduced pilot schemes or full baby box schemes over the last two years. Wales and Northern Ireland do not have any baby box schemes.

31 July, 2018

Today (Wednesday 1st August) marks the start of World Breastfeeding Week (WBW) 2018 and this year the theme is ‘Foundation of Life’.

World Breastfeeding week 2018 will focus on how breastfeeding helps prevent malnutrition in all its forms, ensures food security even in times of crisis and breaks the cycle of poverty.

31 July, 2018

Media outlets have reported about a suicide bombing at a midwife training centre in Afghanistan. Commenting on the attack, Gill Walton, Chief Executive and General Secretary of the Royal College of Midwives, said: “This is a despicable and cowardly attack on people who are dedicated to the care and wellbeing of women and their babies, as well as the children that were at the centre. Such an attack can have no political motive, it is simply evil.

31 July, 2018

Today  the World Health Organisation and UNICEF have published a report on breastfeeding in the first hour after birth. It says that an estimated 78 million babies – or three in five – are not breastfed within the first hour of life, putting them at higher risk of death and disease and making them less likely to continue breastfeeding.

30 July, 2018


The Scottish Government have today pledged to help support mothers in Scotland to breastfeed for longer through a £2 million pound investment programme.

The additional funding, which comes ahead of World Breastfeeding Week, will be used by health boards and other partners to prevent or manage common issues which can affect how long mums breastfeed for.

The investment aims to address the government's commitment through its Diet and Healthy Weight Delivery Plan to reduce the drop off in breastfeeding rates at six to eight weeks after birth by 10% by 2025.

This follows advice from the World Health Organisation which shows that as well as giving babies the best nutritional start in life breastfeeding can improve the long-term health of mothers and children and prevent obesity.


 

20 July, 2018

Today the new Secretary of State for Health and Social Care made  a speech outlining his priorities for the NHS. Commenting on his reported speech, Gill Walton, Chief Executive and General Secretary of the Royal College of Midwives, said: “These are very encouraging words and we look forward to working with the new Health Secretary.

13 July, 2018

Research published today (Friday 13th of July) by JAMA shows an increased prevalence of depression in today’s young mothers, compared with their mother’s generation giving birth to their daughters in the 1990s.

Responding to the research, Clare Livingstone Professional Policy Advisor at the Royal College Midwives (RCM) said; “This is a very interesting study. The findings show rates of depression in pregnancy are up by fifty percent in a generation which is quite alarming.

13 July, 2018

Research published today (Friday 13th of July) by JAMA shows an increased prevalence of depression in today’s young mothers, compared with their mother’s generation giving birth to their daughters in the 1990s.

Responding to the research, Clare Livingstone Professional Policy Advisor at the Royal College Midwives (RCM) said; “This is a very interesting study. The findings show rates of depression in pregnancy are up by fifty percent in a generation which is quite alarming.

12 July, 2018

The Royal College of Midwives (RCM) is aware that there is significant concern being expressed by members of the Elgin and Moray community about the proposed changes to maternity services at the Dr Gray’s hospital and we understand those concerns. The maternity services in Elgin are a much loved, valued, highly respected and vital part of the community. 

The RCM believes that women and their families should be able to access high quality safe maternity care as close to their home as possible. 

The RCM’s understanding of the situation is that the maternity unit will temporarily become a midwife led unit, changing from its current status as a consultant led unit.  The midwife led unit will be able to provide labour, birth and early postnatal care to healthy women who do not have complications in their pregnancy and do not have risk factors that mean they would be advised to give birth in a consultant led setting.  Where it is known before labour starts that a woman will need obstetric led care, women will be advised that they will generally be cared for at Aberdeen maternity hospital.  Where a woman starts her labour at the midwife led unit at Dr Gray’s, but then requires transfer to consultant led care, the Scottish ambulance service will follow established transfer arrangements and generally take the woman to Raigmore hospital as it is the nearest obstetric unit for most women living in Moray.  Women, whatever their health status, will be able to continue to receive their routine antenatal and postnatal care as they always have in Elgin and Moray.

The RCM would like to reassure women and their families in the Elgin area that there is strong research evidence for the safety of freestanding midwife led units.  The ‘Birthplace’ study undertaken by the National Perinatal Epidemiology unit and published from 2011 to 2017 looked at the outcomes of around 65,000 births and found that for healthy women with a low risk of complications, a midwife led unit offers a safe place to give birth.  In fact, women who give birth in a midwife led setting are less likely to experience interventions, while having as good outcomes for themselves and their babies, as women who give birth in an obstetric led setting.  Women who have given birth before have a low chance of being transferred because of complications arising during labour or birth (about one in ten chance).   Midwife led units are a well established model of care in many parts of the UK, including other rural areas in Scotland and Wales, with similar travel times to the obstetric unit as in Elgin.  Dr Gray’s hospital has a great team of very experienced, committed and highly skilled midwives who are educated to a high level to provide safe and high quality care to women throughout the childbirth journey.  They have up to date training on all aspects of care including identifying the need to transfer in a timely way, recognising complications early and responding effectively to any emergency situation.   Childbirth for most women is a normal physiological process that does not require medical intervention.  Midwives are the experts in facilitating this physiological process, with the skills to intervene if needed.

The RCM’s understanding of the reason for the change in status of the maternity unit in Elgin is due to long standing and recurring problems with recruitment of doctors to work at Dr Gray’s, particularly in the paediatric team. The RCM agrees that if safe levels of medical cover are not possible, then it is not safe to continue to offer a service for high risk women and babies that are likely to require medical intervention.


 

11 July, 2018

Experts from the Royal College of Midwives and Slimming World are calling for clearer guidance on healthy weight management for expectant mothers, and more support, training and equipment for midwives.

10 July, 2018

The Royal College of Midwives (RCM) is today celebrating having scooped ‘Best Digital Member Communication’ at the TUC’s Annual Communications Awards.

The RCMs’ winning entry was a series of short video animations on FGM which form part of the RCM’s campaign to highlight the ongoing practice of FGM here in the UK and end FGM by 2030. 

Janet Fyle Professional Policy Advisor at RCM collected the award along with FGM campaigner, psychotherapist and founder of the Dahlia project Leyla Hussein. 

10 July, 2018

There have been media reports about the US Government’s refusal to support a WHO breastfeeding resolution. Commenting on the issue, Clare Livingstone, Professional Policy Advisor at the Royal College of Midwives, said: “Whilst we do not know the detail about this, what is clear is that breastfeeding brings the greatest benefits in terms of health to the baby and also benefits the mother; for example in reducing the chances of breast cancer.

9 July, 2018

 

The Royal College of Midwives (RCM) has today responded to an annual report published by NHS Digital on Female genital mutilation (FGM) for 2017/18.

The FGM enhanced dataset from NHS Digital* is a repository for collection of individual data collected by healthcare providers in England, including acute hospital providers, mental health providers and GP practices.

5 July, 2018

 

‘Children of mothers who follow a healthy lifestyle have a substantially lower risk of developing obesity than children of mothers who don’t make healthy lifestyle choices’ that’s according to a new study published in the British Medical Journal(BMJ) today (July 5th).The findings show that risk was lowest among children whose mothers maintained a healthy weight, exercised regularly, did not smoke, ate a healthy diet, and were light to moderate drinkers.

The study has also highlighted the potential benefits of parent based strategies to curb childhood obesity.

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