• Call us now: 0300 303 0444
  • Call us now: 0300 303 0444
Press releases

You are here

23 February, 2017

NHS Highland is working with the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) to improve the support available for midwives and maternity colleagues. The Board’s maternity services have signed the RCM’s Caring for You Charter, which aims to improve the health, safety and wellbeing of maternity staff. This supports and enables them to continue providing the highest levels of maternity care for women and their families.

22 February, 2017

Today NHS Improvement has published a report ‘Reducing harm leading to avoidable admission of full- term babies into neonatal units’. The report says that many neonates are needlessly separated from their mothers to receive treatment for these common health complaints, as most treatments for these health complaints could be better provided in the community or without separating mother or baby.

22 February, 2017

Today the Scottish Government responded to the recent publication of the Scottish National Review of Maternity and Neonatal Services. Commenting on the Scottish Government response, the RCM’s Director for Scotland Mary Ross-Davie, said: “This is a significant and important moment for maternity services in Scotland, and this announcement re-emphasises that. I am heartened by the Government’s response and their commitment to providing the best possible care to mothers, babies and their families.

21 February, 2017

 

 

RCM comments on RCOG report ‘Maternal Mental Health – Women’s Voices’

Only seven percent (7%) of women suffering with mental health problems during or after pregnancy are refereed to specialist care, that’s according to survey results published today by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG).

The report entitled Maternal Mental Health - Women’s Voices* has also been supported by the Maternal Mental Health Alliance (MMHA). The survey results bring together the experiences of care women with mental health problems have received, their engagement with healthcare professionals and the quality of care they received.

The 2,300 women who were surveyed had all had given birth within the last 5 years and frequently reported that they had received inconsistent and conflicting advice from healthcare professionals.

21 February, 2017

The Royal College of Midwives (RCM) has garnered support for the retention of consultant led maternity services at West Cumberland Hospital (WCH) in Whitehaven from across the political spectrum ahead of the Copeland by-election next week.

The RCM for sometime now has been campaigning for the existing consultant led maternity services to remain at Whitehaven based on the significant distance to Cumberland Infirmary and the risks of such a lengthy journey time.

Commenting, Sean O’ Sullivan Head of Policy and Public Affairs at the RCM says; “The RCM has publically shared its concerns about the proposals for the future of maternity services in West Cumbria. Our concerns are shared not only with midwives and other frontline staff at Whitehaven, but by members of the public and now local politicians have voiced their opposition to the proposed removal of existing services at Whitehaven.

21 February, 2017

North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust is working with the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) to improve the support available for midwives and maternity colleagues.

21 February, 2017

Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust (MTW) is working with the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) to improve the support available for midwives and maternity colleagues.

20 February, 2017

Today the Welsh Government announced a 40% increase in the number of university places for student midwives in the coming academic year. Commenting on the announcement, Vicky Richards, National Officer at the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) in Wales said: “This is a very welcome increase in the numbers of student midwives. It will go a long way towards offsetting the large numbers of midwives due to retire in the coming years.

17 February, 2017

Today (Friday 17th February) NHS England have published the findings of the Local Supervising Authority (LSA) Independent National Audit of Supervisory Investigations in England.

The audit was undertaken across four regions of NHS England from April – September 2016 and included the audit of midwifery supervisory investigations from the 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2015.

14 February, 2017

Leicester’s Hospitals is working with the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) to improve the support available for midwives and maternity colleagues. The maternity services at Leicester’s Hospitals have signed the RCM’s ‘Caring for You Charter’, which aims to improve the health, safety and wellbeing of maternity staff, as well as supporting and enabling them to continue providing the highest level of maternity care for women and their families.

13 February, 2017

The Royal College of Midwives (RCM) has published new guidance to help midwives and their mangers to better meet the needs of responding to women’s wishes for a specific midwife to be present at their birth.

Facilitating women’s choice of midwife: Practical approaches to managing with flexibility; was produced by the RCM in response to requests for help from members.

The RCM recognises that while it is important  to accommodate women’s wishes, it can be a challenge within the constraints of running an efficient service and managing shift patterns. 

RCM developed the guidance on how requests can be facilitated by consulting widely amongst midwives and also sought input from the Clinical Negligence Scheme for Trusts, one of the local supervising authority midwifery officers, and the NHS England maternity lead.
 

8 February, 2017

‘GPs should ask women who have given birth about their eating and sleeping habits in case they are suffering from depression’ that’s according to new indicators proposed by NICE.

Their guidance also reiterates that women should be asked about their mental state at their first midwife appointment when they are around eight to 10 weeks pregnant.

Depression and anxiety are the most common mental health problems during pregnancy, with around twelve percent of women experiencing depression and thirteen percent experiencing anxiety at some point.

The new guidance states that women should be asked about symptoms such as poor sleeping and eating at their six-week check.

During the first appointment with a midwife they should also be asked questions about mental health, such as how often in the past month have they been bothered by feeling down, depressed or hopeless.

Women should also be asked if they've lost interest in doing things they usually enjoy, if they are bothered by feeling nervous, anxious or worried and if they are able to sleep.

6 February, 2017

Maternity services in Wales must be ‘future proofed’ now as a matter or urgency warns the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) as it launches its annual State of Maternity Services Report 2016.

Over one in three (35%) of midwives working in the NHS in Wales in March 2016 were in their fifties or sixties. In 2011, the most numerous group of midwives were those in their late forties; in 2016, it was those in their early fifties.

With more babies being born and more midwives in Wales heading towards there is an urgent need to make more training places available to newly qualified midwives.

In Wales the age profile of mothers has also changed, in 2014 there were almost a thousand more babies born to women in their early thirties, compared to 2003.

Births to women aged 40 or over rose by over 300 during the same period, passing the 1,000-mark. While births to those over thirty and above rise we are seeing fewer births to women in wales in their twenties or younger, Births to those aged under 25 fell by 1,400.

The RCM’s State of Maternity Services report is the annual look at the UK’s maternity services, bringing together information about all four UK countries. The report will officially be launched in London at the House of Commons at 9am on Tuesday the 7th February.

6 February, 2017

NHS maternity services are “reaching crisis point” according to a new report published today by the Royal College of Midwives (RCM), with England short of 3,500 midwives.

The rising shortage is made worse by the fact that over a third of the UK’s NHS midwives are nearing retirement age. Two in five midwives in Scotland and Northern Ireland are in their fifties or sixties, and over 1,000 midwives in England are 60 or older.

 “A vast proportion of our midwives are close to retirement,” said RCM chief executive Cathy Warwick. “We’re lucky to have them. They are doing great work every day. But it’s an inescapable fact that they will soon take their well-deserved retirement. That will challenge our maternity units and put the whole system potentially on the brink of collapse.”

The RCM’s State of Maternity Services report is the annual look at the UK’s maternity services, bringing together information about all four UK countries. The report will officially be launched in London at the House of Commons at 9am on Tuesday the 7th February.

6 February, 2017

More births to older women and an ageing midwifery workforce spell problems for the future of Northern Ireland’s maternity services. This is the message from the  Royal College of Midwives (RCM) launching its annual UK State of Maternity Services Report today.

Pages