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Research shows how to successfully screen for pre-eclampsia in first trimester

17 August, 2010

Research shows how to successfully screen for pre-eclampsia in first trimester

Early-onset pre-eclampsia in nulliparous women can be predicted by identifying a combination of clinical characteristics and first trimester maternal serum biomarkers, a Canadian study has found. Posted 17 August 2010 by Julie Griffiths
Early-onset pre-eclampsia in nulliparous women can be predicted by identifying a combination of clinical characteristics and first trimester maternal serum biomarkers, a Canadian study has found.

The researchers said in the paper that the relevant biomarkers were pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, Inhibin-A, and placental growth factor.

The paper was published on the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology website this month (6 August).

Researchers sought to evaluate the screening accuracy of pregnancy hypertensive disorders by maternal serum biomarkers and uterine artery Doppler in the first trimester.

Of the 893 nulliparous women involved in the study, researchers found that 2.2% developed gestational hypertension and 4.5% developed pre-eclampsia.

Of those who developed pre-eclampsia, 1% were categorised as early-onset and 1.8% had a severe case of the condition.

A combined screening model with clinical characteristics, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, Inhibin-A, and placental growth factor could detect 75% of early-onset preeclampsia at a 10% false-positive rate.

After adjustment for clinical variables, uterine artery Doppler, placental protein 13, and A disintegrin and metalloprotease 12 did not improve the diagnostic accuracy.

Six of the seven authors are from the Université de Montréal with the remaining academic based in the Université Laval in Québec.

The paper Screening for Pre-eclampsia using First Trimester Serum Markers and Uterine Artery Doppler in Nulliparous Women was presented at the 30th annual meeting of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine in Chicago earlier this year.


 
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