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New cord blood bank and research institute

8 August, 2008

New cord blood bank and research institute

A multi-million pound cord blood bank and research institute is to be opened at Nottingham Trent University in September.
 Posted 8 August, 2008
  

A multi-million pound cord blood bank and research institute is to be opened at Nottingham Trent University in September.

The building, which has been established by the Anthony Nolan Trust, cost £1.5m to develop and will house research to improve the outcome of cord blood in transplantations, work on the viability and storage of cord blood and also provide cord blood samples to stem cell research work.

Funding for the new centre has been awarded by the East Midlands Development Agency. A further £27 million is set to fund the project over the next five years, during which the number of collection centres will increase to ten across the UK.

It is hoped the stem cells can be used for research into many diseases, including heart and liver conditions, diabetes and autoimmune disease.

Since last December, around 50 mothers from London’s King College Hospital have donated blood to the bank.

The Anthony Nolan Trust Cord Blood Bank builds on the charity’s bone marrow donor register. It first expanded into cord blood five years ago, by sourcing donations from overseas. Last year, it matched and imported stem cells for 58 UK transplant patients.

By 2013, it aims to store around 50,000 cord blood units, of which 20,000 will be used for transplantation and 30,000 for research.

King’s College Hospital midwife Terie Duffy has collected cord blood and trained other midwives.

She said: ‘We have been careful to ensure that collecting the cord blood has not intruded on labour or birth, and is a positive experience for every mother.'

She added: ‘Both the women and their partners have found no ethical or moral dilemma in the ethos of cord blood collection and applaud the idea of helping others have another chance to live.’

 

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