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Neonatal screening unit opened

9 June, 2008

Neonatal screening unit opened

A neonaral screening unit at is done as part of the 'heel the Birmingham Hospital was opened last monrh by the Bishop of Birmingham Rt Reverend Dr John Senramu.

Midwives magazine: August 2004

 

A neonaral screening unit at is done as part of the 'heel the Birmingham Hospital was opened last monrh by the Bishop of  Birmingham Rt Reverend Dr  John Senramu. 

 

  This marked the impact and development of the national NHS sickle cell and thalassaemia screening programme, which began in September 2003. The screening is a result of the governments £7.7 million nvestment as set out in the NHS plan.

 

The programme consists of two phases, antenatal and neonatal and aims to improve public awareness of the disorders to increase acceptance of being screened within both high-risk communities and the general population. The antenatal screening offered by midwives will allow parents to make informed choices early in pregnancy. Neonatal screening is done as part of the ‘heel prick’  test carried out by midwives. Programme director Allison streetly said that they are on schedule for the whole of engalnd to be covered by antenatal screening by march 2006 and for neonatal by march 2005.

 

It is estimated that there are 12,500 people in England living with the sickle cell disorder, an increase of 60% over the last ten years, and more than 700 living with thalassaemia. The highest prevalence of the disorders is found among black and minority ethnic groups with black Caribbean, African and black british communities showing the highest prevelance of sickle cell disorder and thalassaemia most common within Cypriot, Indian , Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Chinese populations.

 


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