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Mobile phone use not linked to neurodevelopment in children

15 September, 2017

Mobile phone use not linked to neurodevelopment in children

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Maternal use of mobile phones during pregnancy is not likely to cause any adverse effects on a child’s neurodevelopment, according to new research.

The findings, published in BMC Public Health, provide evidence that exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields associated with maternal use of mobile phones is not linked to the child’s language, communication and motor skills.

It was revealed that maternal mobile phone use might even lower the risk of a child having low language and motor skills at age three.

The study found that children born to mobile phone users had a 27% lower risk of having lower sentence complexity, 14% lower risk of incomplete grammar and 31% lower risk of having moderate language delay at age three, compared to children of mothers who reported no mobile phone use. 

It also revealed that children born to mobile phone users had an 18% lower risk of low motor skills at age three, compared to children born to non-users of mobile phones. 

The researchers analysed data from a large Norwegian population-based pregnancy cohort study, which involves a range of data collected from mothers and children during and after pregnancy. 

Data used in this study included 45,389 mother-child pairs for whom self-reported questionnaire data was available on maternal mobile phone use and neurodevelopment follow ups of the children at ages three and five.

Senior author from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Professor Jan Alexander said: ‘The beneficial effects we report should be interpreted with caution due to the limitations common in observational studies, but our findings should at least alleviate any concern mothers have about using their mobile phone while pregnant.’


Access the research here.
 

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