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FGM stats are ‘most concerning’

6 December, 2016

FGM stats are ‘most concerning’

More than 1200 newly reported cases of FGM were recorded in England in the third quarter of this year. 

NHS digital has today (6 December) released the statistics, which support the Department of Health’s FGM prevention programme in England.
 
The report, covering July to September, shows 1205 newly recorded cases and 1971 total attendances where FGM was identified or a procedure for FGM was undertaken. 
 
Almost half of all cases (four in nine) relate to women and girls from London NHS commissioning areas.

Outside of London, the areas with the most reports (to the nearest five) were Birmingham (125), Bristol (90), Manchester (50) and Sheffield (40).
 
Janet Fyle, RCM professional policy advisor, said that the latest set of data is ‘most concerning’.

‘Midwives are one of the key frontline healthcare professions in detecting and helping to prevent female genital mutilation, but all healthcare professionals need to be vigilant in identifying those at risk,’ she said.
 
‘The RCM has been providing its members with improved learning resources such as i-learn tutorials, along with practical advice and support to enable them to continue identifying women and children at risk of FGM or indeed survivors of FGM.
 
‘Also, the community clearly has a role to play in ending FGM but the state cannot abdicate its responsibilities for ending FGM, we owe a duty to the girls who continue to be victims of FGM.’

The number of recorded cases in girls under eighteen was 39, there were 34 newly recorded cases identified in women and girls born in the UK and 15 cases of FGM undertaken in the UK.

Janet said: ‘It is shocking and requires immediate action, because it indicates that girls continue to be at risk of FGM – even in the UK where we have strived to put in place measures to protect them, which appear not to be robust enough.’
 
For more information and to read the full report, click here.

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