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EBM
  • 2 November, 2011
    'Increasing women's access to quality midwifery services has become a focus of global efforts to realise the right of every woman to the best possible health care during pregnancy and childbirth.' This is the opening statement of 'The state of the world's midwifery' report's executive summary (UNFPA, 2011), which was launched at this year's ICM congress in Durban.
  • 2 September, 2011
    The objective of this paper is to describe current pre-registration curricula models and methods and the implications of resource issues for midwife teachers/lecturers and midwifery education provision in the UK.
  • 2 September, 2011
    Many pregnant women are affected by nausea and vomiting and some will use complementary medicine to manage their symptoms. Although the evidence of safety and efficacy for many of these therapies is predominantly anecdotal, over the past decade there have been an increasing number of clinical trials investigating their effects. This paper reviews the current evidence, focusing on clinical trials, for the use of complementary therapies to manage nausea and vomiting in pregnancy.
  • 2 September, 2011
    Action research is now reported globally and is carried out in a variety of contexts to incorporate a range of professions including midwifery. It is impossible to describe a one-dimensional approach because there are such diverse sources that inspire action researchers. Given that the purpose of action research is to engage in a dynamic relationship with constantly changing situations, it is appropriate that a ‘one size fits all’ is not achievable.
  • 2 September, 2011
    A maternity unit in Northern Ireland, providing care at that time for approximately 2750 childbearing women, was the setting for this research study. The aim: To explore inter-professional teamwork during obstetric emergencies.
  • 2 September, 2011
    Constructing a research methodology is one way of meeting the assessment criteria at masters’ level study. How to undertake this process is less well documented than how to write a dissertation. This article examines how one methodology, a radical textual analysis, was constructed after examining the discourse analysis literature, which covers approaches to words, conversations, events and documents.
  • 2 September, 2011
    Midwife researchers face a challenge to reclaim and revolutionise UK antenatal education programmes as a catalyst to achieving optimal birth. We propose that a radical reform of such education using salutogenic theory will provide the necessary shift of focus from the prevailing and negative forces associated with avoiding risk to that of a more positivistic and optimal health promoting experience for women.
  • 13 June, 2011
    This paper discusses the combined use of diaries and interviewing for the collection of data, using examples from a PhD study that explored the feelings, perceptions and experiences of women in relation to their perineum following childbirth.
  • 13 June, 2011
    This paper will discuss some of the challenges that may be encountered by midwifery researchers when conducting research where the research setting is familiar or study participants are known to the researchers...
  • 13 June, 2011
    The objectives of the paper are to define EI and to present an original framework for reflection on the significance of this attribute in midwifery (see Figure 1). This framework illustrates the impact of emotional intelligence on practice, particularly in relation to improving the quality of care delivered to women, and enhancing our relationships with colleague...
  • 13 June, 2011
    The aim of this paper is to describe the organisation of maternity care at trust and unit level in England.
  • 13 June, 2011
    In this paper, I describe the process that led to the publication of the two editions and highlight the differences between the two. Three important themes that run through both editions will be illustrated, namely: the impact of the context of care on practice; the role of the midwife; and the experience of the childbearing woman and her family...
  • 13 June, 2011
    We live in a modern world in which seeing is believing and we only believe what we can see. This phenomenon is known as occularcentrism (Jenks, 1995) and it is pervasive, silent and infiltrative. Our modern society values and promotes science and technology, evidenced in the value we place on the visual image or cinematics over and above the phonetics of annunciation that comes to us from the 'word'...
  • 9 May, 2011
    ‘Technology produces values of unimpeachable merit, whilst simultaneously destroying values no less important - impossible to state that technology brings about absolute progress or regress.’
  • 9 May, 2011
    This paper describes the recent growth of service user or public involvement in health research and aligns it to the emergence of a new paradigm that provides a framework to underpin this type of participatory research.
  • 9 May, 2011
    This paper defines and examines the nature and manifestations of bullying in midwifery as experienced by a cohort of student midwives in the UK.
  • 9 May, 2011
    This study was undertaken to assess the existing practice of performing episiotomy and to develop multidisciplinary evidence-based guidelines, which could be introduced to change practice around the routine use of episiotomy.
  • 9 May, 2011
    The purpose of this study was to explore factors influencing women’s breastfeeding experiences following caesarean section (CS).
  • 9 May, 2011
    This paper summarises the research base relating to the use of identified psychological theories in realising behavioural change in professional practice.
  • 28 February, 2011
    Information for authors from the March 2011 issue.

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