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Cathy Warwick

Cathy Warwick trained as a midwife at Queen Charlotte's Hospital, qualifying in 1976.  She worked as a midwife at Kingston Hospital and St Mary's Hospital before qualifying as a midwife teacher.  She worked as a tutor at St Mary's throughout the 1980s and during this time she completed her MSc in social policy.

 

Trained as a midwife at Queen Charlotte's Hospital, qualifying in 1976.  She worked as a midwife at Kingston Hospital and St Mary's Hospital before qualifying as a midwife teacher.  She worked as a tutor at St Mary's throughout the 1980s and during this time she completed her MSc in social policy.

 

In the early 90s she became head of the department of womens health studies in the North London Joint College of Nursing and Midwifery and became head of midwifery and gynaecology nursing at King's College Hospital in 1994, now holding the post of General Manager for Women & Children's services combined with Director of Midwifery.

 

Throughout her career Cathy has worked to support midwives in promoting women -centred care and to encourage choice / reduce unnecessary intervention.  At King's she runs one of the largest homebirth services in the country and in 2004 Kings maternity services received a Department of Health commendation for reducing the caesarean section rate.

 

Cathy has written and lectured widely on the organisation of midwifery care and supporting midwives and has worked with maternity units in the UK to promote women-centred care.

 

In 1999 Cathy became a member of the UKCC and was also appointed to its successor body – the Nursing and Midwifery Council.  As chair of the statutory midwifery committee she has worked to ensure that regulation is used to promote the highest standards of midwifery practice in the provision of women-centred care.

 

In 2004 Cathy was appointed as Honorary Professor of Midwifery at Kings College London in recognition of her contribution to the institution including her collaboration on research projects. Cathy then went on to become the Chief Executive of the Royal College of Midwives in 2008 where she remains today.

 

Cathy is a well respected midwife who has contributed greatly to advancement of the midwifery profession.  Her achievements and accomplishments are vast and she is a voice of considered reason and counsel.  Cathy constantly challenges the status quo with new ways of developing and delivering women focused care.  She has published widely in many journals and disseminated caseload midwifery practice as a workable national model in the NHS.  Her leadership and vision supported and championed the Albany midwifery practice to be included in the local NHS sector as independent midwives practitioners and this model remains a facet for midwifery care provision.  Her charisma and excellence in midwifery has brought about fundamental change for women both locally in an inner London deprived social setting and nationally as caseload midwifery practice has evolved.

 

She has supported and developed her senior staff and midwives and Cathy has been an example with her skills of management and leadership.  A number of midwifery initiatives at Kings have won local and national awards and recognition.

 

Cathy has sat on various advisory committees at the Department of Health relating to midwifery workforce and service issues.

 

Cathy has visited midwifery services in Sri Lanka, South Africa, Hong Kong, China and America. 

 

Apart from her active working life she has a busy social life. She has three children, loves mountain biking, motorbike riding, reading and regularly goes to films, theatre and opera.

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